thebluelip-blondie:

ras-al-ghul-is-dead:

A silent protest in Love Park, downtown Philadelphia orchestrated by performance artists protesting the murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson. The onslaught of passerby’s  wanting to take photos with the statue exemplifies the disconnect in American society.  Simply frame out the dead body, and it doesn’t exist.  

Here are some observations by one of the artists involved in the event:

I don’t know who any of these folks are.

They were tourists I presume.

But I heard most of what everything they said. A few lines in particular stood out. There’s one guy not featured in the photos. His friends were trying to get him to join the picture but he couldn’t take his eyes off the body.

"Something about this doesn’t feel right. I’m going to sit this one out, guys." "Com’on man… he’s already dead."

(Laughs.)

There were a billion little quips I heard today. Some broke my heart. Some restored my faith in humanity. There was an older white couple who wanted to take a picture under the statue.

The older gentleman: “Why do they have to always have to shove their politics down our throats.” Older woman: “They’re black kids, honey. They don’t have anything better to do.”

One woman even stepped over the body to get her picture. But as luck would have it the wind blew the caution tape and it got tangle around her foot. She had to stop and take the tape off. She still took her photo.

There was a guy who yelled at us… “We need more dead like them. Yay for the white man!”

"One young guy just cried and then gave me a hug and said ‘thank you. It’s nice to know SOMEBODY sees me.’

I’m just gonna keep reblogging this because this is truly how white America works. Like people have their weddings on plantations, Blackface was and still is a major source of entertainment and the biggest movie of all time was Gone With the Wind. White America will kill Black people and then smile and laugh and enjoy their day it sickens me that we’re treated this way.

(Source: adorebell)

nakeyab:

Staging beauty through material products and by-products created between the 70s & 80s. Re-imagining a black feminist identity without the physical presence the body.
www.nakeyab.com

nakeyab:

Staging beauty through material products and by-products created between the 70s & 80s. Re-imagining a black feminist identity without the physical presence the body.

www.nakeyab.com

latinagabi:

I think I might have some upset people on my Facebook tonight.  💁💁

latinagabi:

I think I might have some upset people on my Facebook tonight.
💁💁

megaparsecs:

i just wanted to put this out there since im sure it’ll get written about differently tomorrow. 

thewilsonblog:

And another thing

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Always remember that police brutality is not just a man’s issue. It is a woman’s issue as well and it’s time to treat it as such. This involves all of us yet I have only heard of the men that are dead. It’s a shame that I don’t know even half of these names. Definitely…

blackcreaturefromthelagoon:

dragondicks:

promoting body positivity for larger girls:

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doing so by throwing skinny girls under the bus, calling thinner girls “fake”, or insisting that being bigger is “what men really want” (implying that any female body type is only good if it has male approval):

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thecoalitionmag:

BIG JOANIE: BLACK FEMINIST SISTAH PUNK

Big Joanie are a black feminist punk band based in London, UK, who formed in July 2013 to play First Timers in November 2013, a gig where every band played their first set. Big Joanie are Chardine (drums & vocals), Steph (guitar & vocals) and Kiera (bass & vocals).

Big Joanie are influenced by Nirvana, Riot Grrrl, Throwing Muses, X-Ray Spex, The Bags, My Bloody Valentine, The Ronettes, Darlene Love, Tina Turner, Jesus and the Mary Chain, Breeders, PJ Harvey, Shop Assistants.

We’re like The Ronettes filtered through 80s DIY and riot grrrl with a sprinkling of dashikis.

Big Joanie formed to make awesome music but also to create a continuum for black punks by presenting a strong, powerful vision of black womanhood and telling black kids about black punks who came before us. By making black punks more visible we believe we can inspire more young black punks to get involved in punk music more.

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